Xbox 360 – PS3 – Wii

Xbox 360


The good: Sleeker design; 17 percent smaller; much quieter operation; better cooling; touch-sensitive power and disc tray; 250GB hard drive; built-in Wi-Fi; five USB ports; dedicated Kinect port; onboard optical digital audio.

The bad: The hard drive is still proprietary; controller on D-pad remains unchanged; cumbersome power block; renders existing faceplates useless; no cables for HD gaming out of the box.

The bottom line: Though the new Xbox 360 certainly addresses most of the concerns we’ve had with the versions before it, we don’t think it warrants a purchase if you already own an Xbox 360 in working order with an HDMI-out port and a hard drive.


The good: All games in high-definition; easy-to-use Dashboard interface; excellent online gaming and communications via Xbox Live; plays hundreds of (but not all) original Xbox titles; doubles as a superior digital media hub and Windows Media Center extender; online Marketplace allows for easy purchases of downloadable full-scale games, mini-games, movies, and TV shows; latest version offers HDMI output with 1080p support.

The bad: Early versions of the console prone to “red ring of death” system crash; noisy exhaust fan and DVD drive; gigantic oversize power supply; no built-in wireless networking or flash media reader; DVD playback has substandard video quality; support for next-gen HD DVD movies requires a bulky external accessory; 20GB hard drive fills up very quickly; online gaming requires a paid subscription to Xbox Live.

The bottom line: With its extensive digital media features, a superior online service, and an excellent game library, the Xbox 360 remains the game console to beat.